stefanie's blog

Katy Bowman biomechanist is at it again with her amazing new book “Move Your DNA”. In this book Katy dives deep into why it is so important to move your body but also truly defines the term movement. She states that a lot of our typical ailments and diseases are actually caused by our own captivity.

I absolutely love this time of year, everything is in bloom and gardens are being harvested. Walking home from tennis yesterday I noticed a blackberry bush is already ready to be picked! It's incredible we can start picking blackberries already; we've truly been fortunate this year.

After some recent courses and letting the all the wonderful information soak in, one thing that stood out was the importance of breathing and how the alignment of your torso can affect it. Any dysfunction or imbalance with your breathing can be felt throughout the body. The primary mover of breathing is your diaphragm and, along with your abdominals and pelvic floor musculature, it also helps to provide stability in the body. In a recent interview with Dr.

Squats are one of the most basic and fundamental human postures. Starting as children we instinctively go into a deep squat when we wanted to reach for something low or hold ourselves in a stable squatting position to engage in play. Observe any small child and you'll notice how instinctive and important this posture is. However, after a long period of sitting primarily in chairs and/or wearing poor footwear, adults can have trouble getting into this once important movement.

"I'm a big advocate for movement; the more you can move in your day the better! A recent rat study showed how effective an increase in the level of movement within a day can influence the functioning of the nervous system. The New York Times summarized the study in their article "How Inactivity Changes the Brain".

"I'm a big advocate for movement; the more you can move in your day the better! A recent rat study showed how effective an increase in the level of movement within a day can influence the functioning of the nervous system. The New York Times summarized the study in their article "How Inactivity Changes the Brain".

 In my continual quest to learn more and more about the body I recently took a course called Neurokinetic Therapy (NKT™) in Vancouver. It was a 3 day course that presented an amazing new way of looking at the body, how it functions and what to do when dysfunctions arise. Developed by David Wienstock, L.M.T. in collaboration with several peers in 1985, NKT™ addresses the causes of dysfunction in the body, not the symptoms.

There is a lot of talk about the fascial system lately. My college Chris has posted articles pertaining to the system and how to keep it healthy specifically through use of massage therapy and foam rollers.

Breathing; so often overlooked, but so very important. Not to be confused with respiration which is automatic, breathing is conscious and linked to emotions and action. Your body will do anything to bring in air, even at the cost of efficient movement. In yoga, it is used to find a balance between the body and the mind, and the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and parasympathetic nervous system (PNS). It is the only thing we do both voluntarily and involuntary.

I'm a big fan of movement. It's so important to get up and move not
just your physical health but your mental health as well. Erik Dalton,
Ph.d., executive director of the Freedom From Pain Institute, and
developer of Myoskeletal Alignment Techniques™ writes:

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